Wednesday, February 12, 2014

It's all in the details

I have known this for a long time. When I'm making books, I love the little details. I love them independently of the finished book. I think that is why I have always been drawn to structure, more than content. In fact, when I first started showing books that I had made and people asked what the book was for, I was baffled by the question. I didn't think about the book's future purpose when I was making it. I was only interested in the structural details. During the past decade, though, I have forced myself to be more aware of the book's future purpose.

It was an introduction to Japanese bookbinding that really captured me, way back when, and which I have explored in great depth over the years. Having recently been making some samples of various traditional Japanese techniques has reminded me about some of those little details that I fell in love with when I first started making books. Here are a few details that I noticed on my worktable this week and had to snap photos...

Like these twisted paper tackets and the texture of Japanese paper...

And perfect turn-ins and corners, or close enough!

And the best square knots ever, made with flat paper cords...

5 comments:

Liz Wilson said...

I know exactly what you mean . For me, it is the process of creation that gets me every time, how each step builds together to form something so beautifully formed.

theresa said...

These are so beautiful. And beautiful for, and of, themselves...(the knots, the papers).

Andres said...

Its all in the details! I love these turn-ins! Reminds me of a post that I sent regarding one of the first books ever made and still in existence was made from 6 pages of 24K Gold. That is some quality BookBinding!

Billie said...

Yes for me its the construction, how things go together fascinates me.

Another 'issue' that keeps coming up, when I gift someone a handbound book, they say they 'save it', its too nice to use. I have a few books that sit on shelves just to look nice but it seems to be a common fete of handbound books.

Rhonda Miller said...

Oh, I know what you mean about people not wanting to use the books! So silly - what's the point saving it? When I hear that, I tell people not to write on the first few pages. Start in the middle even, then it's easier. Do the first page last... or never, doesn't matter. It takes off some pressure, I think :)